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Planning dispute halts new OTR project

For now, the Kensington Park OTR proposal has stalled, however Peregrine says it is considering its options. (Image: OTR Evanston)

A planning dispute has arisen over a new OTR development proposed in the South Australian suburb of Kensington Park, leaving the future of the new fuel outlet in doubt.

A spokesperson for OTR parent Peregrine Corporation told C&I Week the company was reviewing its options with regard to the development, following the release of an Ombudsman’s report which questioned a decision to “call-in” the project for assessment by the Development Assessment Commission.

“In relation to the Kensington Park OTR submission to DAC – we have acted in accordance with the requirements of the Development Act and Development Regulations,” the spokesperson said.

“An application was submitted to the State Coordinator General’s office for assessment and supported by plans, elevations and quantity surveyor’s report (prepared by an independent qualified contractor).

“The design of the site evolved and necessitated a submission of new plans and a further quantity surveyor’s report.

“The matter was assessed and accepted by the SOG’s office as being suitable for call-in under the provisions of the Act and regulations.”

InDaily reported that the matter came to the attention of the South Australian Ombudsman after Burnside Council objected to the project call-in.

Burnside Council CEO Paul Deb raised a complaint about the call-in after the initial project costing was amended, which brought it into eligibility for a call-in assessment.

The Ombudsman’s report called into question economic significance of the new fuel retail outlet, which would create employment for up to 50 staff, and a possible 100 construction jobs.

A spokesperson for OTR parent Peregrine Corporation told C&I Week the company was reviewing its options with regard to the development, following the release of an Ombudsman’s report which questioned a decision to “call-in” the project for assessment by the Development Assessment Commission.

“In relation to the Kensington Park OTR submission to DAC – we have acted in accordance with the requirements of the Development Act and Development Regulations,” the spokesperson said.

“An application was submitted to the State Coordinator General’s office for assessment and supported by plans, elevations and quantity surveyor’s report (prepared by an independent qualified contractor).

“The design of the site evolved and necessitated a submission of new plans and a further quantity surveyor’s report.

“The matter was assessed and accepted by the SOG’s office as being suitable for call-in under the provisions of the Act and regulations.”

InDaily reported that the matter came to the attention of the South Australian Ombudsman after Burnside Council objected to the project call-in.

Burnside Council CEO Paul Deb raised a complaint about the call-in after the initial project costing was amended, which brought it into eligibility for a call-in assessment.

The Ombudsman’s report called into question economic significance of the new fuel retail outlet, which would create employment for up to 50 staff, and a possible 100 construction jobs.

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